"History, despite its wrenching pain,

Cannot be unlived, and if faced

With courage, need not be lived again."

 

Maya Angelou

On the Pulse of the Morning

 

Mission

The mission of our organization is:

to foster knowledge and engagement that will break down resistance to confronting our country's shared legacy of slavery.

Our Shared Vision

We promote opportunities for individuals and communities to become:

  • knowledgeable about the history of enslaved people and their descendants in our country up to the present day
  • able to translate this knowledge into an understanding of the significance of this history for all Americans
  • willing and prepared to act on this understanding to confront and respond to this history
  • able to define and pursue a course of action to address structural and embedded racism

Our Work

The Together is Better Alliance (TiBA) seeks to end racial bias and inequality by confronting our difficult past courageously, thoughtfully and honestly together. We do this by providing historical content and facilitating thoughtful and informed conversations about racial exclusion, injustice and violence.

Systemic racism in the United States continues to wound families and communities. Today’s mass incarceration has been recognized as a continuation of Jim Crow and the ongoing reflection of old myths of black criminality.  Systemic racial bias victimizes the powerless, as well as those in power, through an intentional process which imbeds false and negative perceptions about the value of human life based solely on the color of a person’s skin. These perceptions are manifest in stories of white people calling the police on their African American neighbors for mowing their lawns, driving their cars, being in the parking lot of their own apartment buildings. More horrifying still are the stories like that of a black security guard doing his job being mistaken for a criminal and shot to death.

Even with all of this, there are many who deny that racism is an issue; that laws have been passed to address such matters … so how do we address such matters?

Many agree that the United States has made progress from the past inhumane treatment of marginalized and enslaved peoples. Laws have been passed.  And yes, we even had a black President. However, laws alone have not wiped away the harm caused by involuntary servitude, decades of lynching, centuries of being denied the right to vote or receive an education. The ramifications continue to impact our education, legal and criminal justice systems. It took centuries to get here, it will take a long time to change the current course.

How can we make a difference?
We believe that by working together through education, engagement, and advocacy, change will come.  

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Top Photo Credit: "Black Lives Matter" by 5chw4r7z is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 / Altered from original with gradient mask